1999
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Over 60 flaps to lift to discover the wonderful, mysterious and often funny stories behind some of the world's most ground-breaking inventions. Featuring eye-catching illustrations, quirky facts, and surprises such as flaps within flaps. With internet links to websites to find out more and design your own inventions.

 

Details

ISBN: 9781409532729
Series:See Inside
Audience: Children / Juvenile
Format: Board book
Number of Pages: 16
Publication Date: 1 Nov 2011
Publisher: Usborne Publishing Ltd
Publication City, Country: London, United Kingdom
Dimensions (cm): 28.2(H) x 22.2(L) x 1.5(W)
Weight (gm): 760

 

Reviews

A big bright book with robust pages. Familiar objects, from domestic to industrial, are described on every page and then you lift the flap to find out how they work. So, look inside the piano to see the hammer action, lift the flap on the loo to see how ballcocks work. Check out zips and ballpoint pens. Large machines, like excavators, have more than one flap and a lot of information is packed into small spaces. A book to talk about and maybe follow up on the related website. * Carousel *
A hands-on science lesson! * Lancashire Evening Post *
Famous inventions often come about for strange reasons and this book shows how things were invented, often by chance, such as the sticky burrs on a dog's coat that led to the introduction of velcro.. Lift the flaps (over 60 of them) to reveal intricate drawings which show the hidden workings inside inventions. Engines, flying machines, electricity and more - all explained in easy-to-understand language. * Parents in Touch *
I absolutely loved the interactivity of this 'lift the flaps' book... What's more it is not just a parade of facts - we find out about people and the history behind the inventions, essential context to make the science interesting. * Popular Science *
Find out more about the world's most fascinating and funny inventions. * Hay Fever blog *
These days youngsters don't want to just hear about the mechanics of life, they want to see for themselves exactly what makes our world tick...So Usborne have come up with the perfect answer ... a beautifully designed and illustrated book with over 90 flaps to lift and make exciting discoveries. How Things Work is literally a hands-on science lesson! * Lancashire Evening Post *
I would recommend this book. I liked the flaps and pictures. The information was interesting. Some of it I already knew, but there was lots I didn't. I liked reading about the Swiss engineer who invented Velcro. He got the idea from the burrs that stuck to his dog. * The Times Eureka Magazine *
There's a lot to be said for flaps. They draw out curiosity (who wouldn't want to know what is hidden behind a flap), they introduce drama to reading (what's going to be revealed...?) and they keep hands busy (great if your reader isn't one who likes to sit still), so See Inside Inventions was already looking like a winner, even before we started reading... when we did start reading, we loved the book even more. * Playing by the Book blog *
This is a thoroughly modern information book: highly visual, interactive and linked to websites. In each example the main picture shows the external structure and you lift the flap for an explanation of how the machine works. The copious yet clear annotation shows young readers the importance of the verbal as well as the visual in texts that explain...deserves a place on the Primary school science shelf. * Books for Keeps *

 

Author Biography

Alex Frith has been writing Usborne books since 2005. His diverse output covers such titles as 'See inside Your Head', 'Stories of Thor' and 'Politics for Beginners'. He has spoken at multiple festivals about his book '100 Things to Know About Space'. Alex can be found in London.
See Inside Inventions
1999

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